Outside of Harvard

2017 Jun 01

MHS: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine, Migration, & Opportunity Open at the Massachusetts Historical Society

Thu - Thu, Jun 1 to Aug 24, 10:00am - 4:00pm

Massachusetts Historical Society Founded 1791

Explore the impact of generations of Irish in Boston from famine relief efforts to a mass migration movement, community and institutional building, and a rise in political power.

The Irish have long been an important presence in Boston. The...

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2017 May 20

Mass Historical Society: The History and Collections of the MHS

10:00am to 11:30am

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

 

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: The Irish Atlantic: A Story of Famine Migration and Opportunity...

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2017 May 16

Mass Historical Society: The Winter Workscape: Weather and the Meaning of Industrial Capitalism in the Northern Forest, 1850-1950

5:15pm to 7:30pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

Jason L. Newton, Syracuse University

Comment: Richard W. Judd, University of Maine

Industrial logging operators used the winter weather, wood, simple machines, and muscle power alone to increase the production and transportation of saw logs to reach industrial scale and efficiency. Drawing on methods from environmental and labor history and the history of slavery and capitalism, this essay characterizes industrial capitalism as a force that will sustain seemingly anachronistic modes of production as long as they remain profitable....

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2017 May 10

Mass Historical Society: Avian Affinities and Refashioning Roles: Feathers, Millinery and American Bird Protection

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

Brown Bag Lunch Event

Emily Gephart, School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University

In his Arcades Project, Walter Benjamin argued that fashion’s pursuit of novelty functioned in modern society as an attempt to stave off the inevitability of death. Yet, in millinery fashion at the turn of the 20thcentury, death was often conspicuously visible: popular plumed hats provoked crises in global extinction, inspired passionate advocacy for bird protection and trade restriction, and led—eventually—to wholesale changes in...

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2017 Mar 24

Boston College: Jeffrey Sachs:  Economics and Ethics for the Anthropocene

4:30pm

Location: 

Devlin Hall, Room 008. Boston College, 140 commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA

 

The Boston College Lowell Humanities Series will present:

Jeffrey Sachs: 
Economics and Ethics for the Anthropocene
Friday, March 24 at 4:30 p.m.
Devlin Hall, Room 008

Jeffrey Sachs is a world-renowned professor of economics, leader in sustainable development, senior UN advisor, bestselling author, and syndicated columnist whose monthly newspaper columns appear in more than 100 countries. He is the co-recipient of the 2015 Blue Planet Prize, the leading global prize for environmental leadership, and has twice been named among Time Magazine’s 100 most...

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2017 Mar 31

BCC: Crimes Against Humanity: A Conference on Native American Genocide (Conference)

8:30am to 3:00pm

Location: 

Jackson Arts Center Auditorium, Bristol Community College, 777 Elsbree Street, Fall River, MA 02720

Keynote Address : History of Violence, The Violence of History: Native American Genocide

Dr. Karl Jacoby, Ph. D.

Dr. Jacoby is a History Professor at Columbia University, an author, and a specialist in environmental, borderland, and Native American history. His books include Crimes Against Nature: Squatters, Poachers, Thieves and the Hidden History of American Conservation and Shadows at Dawn: A Borderlands Massacre and the Violence of History.  

Discussion Panel : Native American Voices on Genocide

Featuring:
Linda Coombs...

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2017 Mar 15

BU: Radio ‘Apostles’: AcciónCultural Popular, Rural Development, and the Cold War in Colombia,1947-1974 | Mary Roldán

5:30pm

Location: 

CAS B12. Boston University

 

Mary Roldán, Professor of Latin American History, Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center

In the 1950s and 1960s, the Catholic organization ACPO and its radio station Radio Sutatenza trained peasant leaders to do rural outreach in the wake of violence.  Reworking religion, gender, politics, and the material reality of what it means to do development work, these ACPO-trained “apostles” tried to model a different kind of masculinity that was not about swagger and intimidation, but rather reason, tolerance, and persuasion.

... Read more about BU: Radio ‘Apostles’: AcciónCultural Popular, Rural Development, and the Cold War in Colombia,1947-1974 | Mary Roldán

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