Outside of Harvard

2018 Sep 01

Deadline for Call for Writers: Synapsis Journal of Health Humanities

(All day)

Synapsis is an online publication designed to bring together humanities scholars and students from across institutions and disciplines in a “department without walls." The site is founded and edited by Arden Hegele, a literary scholar, and Rishi Goyal, a medical doctor.

"We are looking for 8-10 PhD students and junior scholars whose work intersects with the medical humanities to become regular writers for our publication. The commitment is one piece of writing...

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2018 Oct 01

Deadline for Call for Proposals

(All day)

Location: 

The Boston Seminar on African American History Massachusetts Historical Society

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The Boston Seminar on African American History invites proposals for sessions in its Spring 2019 series. The Seminar involves discussion of pre-circulated works in progress, especially article or chapter-length papers (20-40 pages), focusing on any aspect of African American history and culture from the...

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2018 Sep 01

Deadline for Call for Papers: The Desire for Method in Early Modern Europe

(All day)

Location: 

Princeton and NYU, October 25-26 2018

This conference is designed to promote engagement between graduate students and professors across disciplines, and it will commence with a workshop for all participants that will discuss the question of method in recent scholarship. Presenters are invited to the conference dinner, hosted by Princeton and NYU. A small number of graduate student bursaries will be available for students traveling long distances to attend the conference.

Please submit 350 word proposals for 15 min papers and a CV to desireformethod@gmail.com by September 1, 2018. All papers must be submitted in...

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2018 Oct 18

MHS: Losing Laroche: The Story of the Titanic’s Only Black Passenger

5:15pm to 7:30pm

Location: 

Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215

Speaker

Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College

Losing Laroche is the first in-depth study of the only black family on board the RMS Titanic. The story of the Haitian Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche and his descendants is largely unknown and troubles the assumption of an all-white Titanic narrative. This paper seeks to understand the possibilities of black advancement in the Titanic moment and throughout the Diaspora.

To RSVP: email seminars@...

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2018 Aug 24

MHS: "A Brazen Wall to Keep the Scriptures Certainty": European Biblical Scholarship in Early America

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the historical and critical study of the Bible, often with highly controversial and factious results. This talk will examine how such exciting but potentially subversive European scholarship was received and transformed by its early American readers, through a close study of the books owned and annotated by seventeenth-century readers in New England and elsewhere.

SPEAKER

Kirsten Macfarlane, University of Cambridge

2018 Aug 08

MHS: The World Becomes Round: Cultural and Commercial Connections between Bombay Parsis and Yankees, 1771-1861

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in Bombay from the 1770s to the 1850s. Commercially, the Parsis began to act as agent-brokers for Massachusetts merchants in the late 1780s. But Parsi Zoroastrian religious ideas and rituals were already known to at least a few readers in New England by spring of 1772, when the first European translations of Zoroastrian texts were sent, at Benjamin Franklin’s recommendation, to the Redwood Athenaeum’s librarian.

Speaker:

Jennifer Rose, Claremont Graduate University...

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2018 Jul 13

MHS: Notes on Phillis Wheatley: Prodigy, Poetics, and the Science of the Human, 1761-1800

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

Event is Free. No Registration Required. 

Camille Owens, Yale University

This talk studies Phillis Wheatley’s significance to the history of black prodigy, focusing on Wheatley’s education as an enslaved child. It reconstructs Wheatley’s education in relation to early American philosophy and pedagogy of childhood, looking to primers, tract literature, and the influence of Locke. From there, it examines the often-cited (and likely fictionalized) “trials” of Phillis Wheatley—and to Jefferson’s Notes on Wheatley—to show...

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2018 Jul 11

MHS: Disestablishing Virtue: Federalism, Religion, and New England Women Writers

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

Event is Free. No Registration Required. 

Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas at Austin

This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, specifically Catharine Sedgwick, in the context of the Federalist commitment to public religion. Sedgwick’s 1824 novel Redwood looks to the French Revolution as a site of U.S. debate about role of religion in a republic, signaling her interest in her father’s earlier Federalism while staking her position in the...

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2018 Jun 30

MHS: Martin Luther King in Boston Walking Tour

3:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Register on their website

As a doctoral student at Boston University’s School of Theology, Martin Luther King, Jr., spent some of his formative years walking the streets of Boston and living in the South End. His life in Boston was King’s first immersive experience outside of the segregated South and while he experienced the de facto racism of the North...

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2018 Jun 26

MHS: William James on Democratic Individuality

6:00pm to 7:30pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30

Stephen Bush, Brown University

There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Register on their website.

William James advocated a philosophy of democracy and pluralism that emphasizes individual and collective responsibility for our social arrangements, our morality, and our religion. In James’s view, democracy resides first...

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2018 Jun 25

MHS: Dis-Union: Disability and the U.S. Civil War

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA
Jean Franzino, Beloit College

This talk will examine the emerging legal category of the “disabled” American at the end of the nineteenth century in relation to the construction of disability in Civil War literature, broadly conceived. In texts ranging from hospital newspaper poetry to mendicant narratives sold for veterans’ financial support, representations of Civil War injury engaged shifting understandings of disability: from individual condition to evolving social class.

   
2018 Jun 22

MHS: Cut from the Same Cloth: Salem, Zanzibar, and the Consolidation of the Indo-Atlantic World, 1820-1870

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

Event is Free. No Registration Required.

Joshua Morrison, University of Virginia

This talk explores the economic and cultural exchange between New England and Zanzibar, the premier entrepôt of the Western Indian Ocean. This trade network linked the cotton magnates of Massachusetts with the Omani elite, Indian merchants, and Swahili slaves of Zanzibar. As the trade expanded, each close-knit community found themselves increasingly dependent on an incredibly foreign counterpart for survival. This project maps the many compromises, adaptations...

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