Elsewhere at Harvard

2015 Dec 11

LYRICA: Beethoven and the Congress of Vienna

9:00am to 5:00pm

Location: 

Pusey Room, The Memorial Church, Harvard Yard

Society for Word-Music Relations - www.lyricasociety.org • lyricasociety@aol.com

The Lyrica Society is pleased to announce its

 9th ANNUAL

LYRICA DIALOGUES AT HARVARD

 BEETHOVEN AND THE CONGRESS OF VIENNA

https://www.facebook.com/events/1642337345982999/

 Friday, 11 December 2015

9 A.m. - 5 p.m.

Pusey Room, The Memorial Church, Harvard Yard...

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2016 Mar 23

Hutchins Center: Spring Colloquium with Vince Brown

12:00pm

Location: 

Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Spring Colloquium

Vincent Brown, Charles Warren Professor of American History; Founding Director, History Design Studio, Harvard University

The Coromantee War: An Archipelago of Insurrection

Free and open to the public.  A Q+A session will follow each talk.  Please feel free to bring a lunch.

2016 Feb 03

Hutchins Center: Spring Colloquium with Sanyu Mojola

12:00pm

Location: 

Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Sanyu Mojola, Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Colorado Boulder

Race, Health and Inequality: Producing an HIV Epidemic in the Shadow of the Capitol

Free and open to the public.  A Q+A session will follow each talk.  Please feel free to bring a lunch.

2015 Dec 14

China Humanities (Mahindra/Fairbank): Becoming a Poet in Early Medieval China: The Possibilities of Intertextuality

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

CGIS Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

Speaker: Wendy Swartz, Rutgers University

Intertextuality lies at the heart of reading and writing practices in early medieval China. Reading and writing well meant demonstrating a command of the textual tradition and cultural codes, and the ability to appropriate them in a range of situations. Intertextuality thus constituted a condition of writing as well as a mode of reading. In particular, from the third to the fifth century, the Chinese literati drew extensively from a set of philosophical classics, namely the Laozi, Zhuangzi, and Yijing (later...

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