Elsewhere at Harvard

2016 Feb 22

Romance Languages: “Translation, Publishing, and World Literature: J.V. Foix’s Daybook 1918 and the Strangeness of Minority”

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Barker Center, Room 133, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Professor Lawrence Venuti, Temple University

Professor Venuti will analyze the translation of poetry in a minority language, such as Catalan, from the broader perspective of world literature. Sponsors: institut ramon lull and the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures

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2016 Apr 21

Standing Committee on Archaeology: "(Re)Conceptualizing the Ruins of Monte Albán"

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

Lindsay Jones (Ohio State)

The extensive remains of Monte Albán, an ancient city in the southern Mexican region of Oaxaca that thrived from roughly 500 BCE–700 CE, lie atop a mountain that affords a striking view of the surrounding valley. A UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987 and one of Mexico’s top archaeological-tourist destinations, Monte Albán was among pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica’s premier capitals. Lindsay Jones will (re)...

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2016 Mar 31

Peabody Museum: "Reviving the Ancient Sounds of Mesoamerican Ocarinas"

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

Jose Cuellar (San Frascisco State University)

Clay ocarinas are thought to be the most common musical instruments used by pre-Columbian societies in Mesoamerica. While little is known about the making and function of these wind instruments—often shaped in animal or human forms—their study reveals that they were associated with both sacred and secular activities. In 2012, musician and ethnologist Jose Cuellar researched the Peabody Museum’s extensive collection of clay ocarinas, flutes, and whistles from archaeological sites throughout Central America and Mexico. In this program he...

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2016 Mar 24

Standing Committee on Archaeology: "Museums in Tanzania: History, Transformation, and Impact"

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

2016 Hallam L. Movius, Jr. Lecture and Reception

Audax Z.P. Mabuella (NMT)

Tanzania hosts a record of more than three million years of human history and diversity, including fossil remains, footprints, and stone toolkits of early humans and hominin ancestors, from sites such as Laetoli, Olduvai Gorge, and Peninj. The National Museum of Tanzania (NMT)—a consortium of six different museums—supports the preservation of the country’s rich natural and cultural diversity through scientific research, education, and...

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2016 Feb 10

Standing Committee on Archaeology: "Units of Analysis in the Middle to Upper Paleolithic Transition in Central Europe"

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Tozzer Anthropology Building Rm. 203, 21 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA

A Talk by Gilbert Tsotevin, University of Minnesota

The Middle Danube Basin of Central Europe plays a critical role in understanding the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition due to its position as one of the major riverine and environmental corridors by which anatomically modern humans entered a Neanderthal-occupied Europe. Central Europe, however, is noticeably different from Western Europe and the Mediterranean Basin, with its greater diversity of industrial types, i.e., two “transitional” industries (the Bohunician and the Szeletian) rather than one, as with the Châtelperronian...

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