Elsewhere at Harvard

2020 Oct 20

Conquered Populations in Early Islam: Non-Arabs, Slaves and the Sons of Slave Mothers

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

 

Join us for the Program in Islamic Law’s Academic Year 2020-2021 Book Talk Webinar Series!

On Tuesday, October 20, 2020, Professor Elizabeth Urban (West Chester University, Assistant Professor of History, Department of History) will speak on her new book, Conquered Populations in Early Islam: Non-Arabs, Slaves...

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2020 Oct 22

Religion and the 2020 Election: a Conversation with James Kloppenberg & EJ Dionne

4:30pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

The Council on the Study of Religion

co-sponsored by the Committee on the Study of Religion and Harvard Divinity School

Invites you to

RELIGION AND THE 2020 ELECTION: A CONVERSATION WITH JAMES KLOPPENBERG & EJ DIONNE

Moderated by Catherine Brekus

Please RSVP at this link:  ...

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2020 Oct 23

Global American Studies Conference: Presentations by Sara Awartani, Courtney Sato, Evan Taparata, and Hannah Waits

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_M4TmB2W1RTGaJ9HTzbNV9w
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Our Global American Studies Postdoctoral Fellows will be offering brief presentations of their work and participating in a discussion.

Sara Awartani
“Solidarities of Liberation, Visions of Empire: Puerto Rico, Palestine, and the US Imperial...

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2020 Oct 21

Washed in the Blood of the Lamb? The American Fate of Christianity

12:30pm to 2:30pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

David Hollinger (University of California, Berkeley)

To access Prof. Hollinger’s pre-circulated paper, please email joshua_mejia@fas.harvard.edu

 

Register: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwtd-usqDMiGNCS8pGsPFB2Q5HzO_vhttabj

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about joining this Zoom meeting....

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2020 Nov 10

Covell Meyskens – Mao’s Massive Military Industrial Campaign to Defend Cold War China

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

Speaker: Covell Meyskens, Assistant Professor of Chinese History, Naval Postgraduate School

In 1964, the Chinese Communist Party made a momentous policy decision. In response to rising tensions with the United States and Soviet Union, a top-secret massive military industrial complex in the mountains of inland China was built, which the CCP hoped to keep hidden from enemy bombers. Mao named this the Third Front. The Third Front received more government investment than any other developmental initiative of the Mao era, and yet this huge industrial war machine,...

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2020 Oct 27

Fei-Hsien Wang – Everybody Loves Qianlong: Vernacular Fantasies, Cultural Consumption, and the “Prosperous Age” in Post-Imperial China

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

Speaker: Fei-Hsien Wang, Associate Professor, Department of History, Indiana University Bloomington

Examining a wide range of cultural products and genres from the late nineteenth century to the present, this talk traces the evolution of the vernacular myths and popular fantasies about Emperor Qianlong (1711-1799). As China’s cultural economy and political climate transforms overtime, new stories and myths about Qianlong emerge to satisfy the changing desires of the audience as well as the political authorities. These popular cultural products have gradually...

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2020 Oct 21

Race and Remembrance in Contemporary Europe

2:00pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

Following the murder of George Floyd in May, cities not only in the United States but also in Europe erupted in demonstrations challenging police violence and racist legacies.

In the United Kingdom, activists removed a statue honoring a famous slaveholder, Edward Colston, and threw it in the River Avon. In the United States, activists projected Black Lives Matter and other images onto the Robert E. Lee Memorial in Richmond, Virginia. In France, President Emmanuel Macron tried to stave off similar movements by preemptively declaring that the Republic would "erase no trace or...

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2020 Oct 26

Hidden Histories of U.S. Internationalists

6:00pm

Location: 

Online (RSVP Required)

Fascism encroaching on democracy -- the American populace riven with discord between ultranationalists and advocates of world responsibilities – public information warped by big lies—these current menaces echo perils of the era from the first through the second world war. Drawing from their recent books Fighting Words: The Bold American Journalists Who Brought the World Home and The...

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2020 Oct 22

New Blocs, New Maps, New Power (ca. 1982)

4:00pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

By the early 1980s, a new political landscape was taking shape that would fundamentally influence American society and politics in the decades to come. That year, the long-standing effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—championed by suffragist Alice Paul and introduced to Congress in 1923—ran aground, owing in significant measure to the activism of women who pioneered a new brand of conservatism. The power and organizational energies of conservative women provided one more proof that the suffragists’ notion of a universal women’s voting “bloc” was an illusion. But in the Reagan era...

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2020 Oct 15

On Account of Race (1965)

4:00pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

The passage of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) in 1965 marked one culmination of a long civil rights movement that began in the wake of the American Civil War and gathered steam in the early 20th century, long before the Montgomery bus boycotts and the emergent leadership of Martin Luther King Jr. inaugurated the best-known phase of the movement. Designed to restore the intention of the 15th Amendment, the VRA invalidated poll taxes, literacy tests, and other prerequisites and practices that had been used to disfranchise African American women and men in the states of the former Confederacy...

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2020 Oct 19

Warren Center Presents: Black Voters Matter: A Pre-election Conversation

3:45pm to 5:45pm

Location: 

Zoom (RSVP Required)

Warren Center Presents: a Pre-Election Conversation with Latosha Brown (Black Voters Matter) Moderated by Jordan Camp (Warren Center Affiliate)

Cosponsored with the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_6dRvdQn1RPaeLSCNKT1J6w

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar...

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